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RSVP Digital Salon: Roundtable on Practicing Digital Humanities and Periodical Scholarship - Shared screen with speaker view
Andrew Hobbs
23:23
Feel free to tweet, #RSVPDigitalSalon
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
24:43
Prezi for the win!!!
Andrew Hobbs
24:52
And if you're not already a member of this friendly and exciting scholarly society, join here: http://rs4vp.org/about/join/
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
33:57
http://www.priceonepenny.info/
Julie Sorge Way
37:17
Can someone paste info on the book she mentioned?
Matt
38:08
I think it’s the O’Reilly PHP/SQL book. O’Reilly is the publisher, anyway.
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
39:22
I didn’t mention: this was 10 years ago, =P
Rosvita Rauch
39:55
Possibly: https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/learning-php-and/0596101104/
Catherine Waters
40:00
quick Q for Marie: how do you define ‘creator’ in your database?
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
40:27
Author/playwright/visual artist
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
40:33
that’s why I use that term
Catherine Waters
41:09
OK but in the example you gave, ‘creator’ was different to ‘author’ …?
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
41:48
Creator is the creator of the source text, “Author” is for the penny author who adapted it
Catherine Waters
42:00
Ah! - thanks
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
42:33
Thanks for the question: I’m not sure I explain it in the How to use page, so I should add that!
Jessie Reeder
45:05
anglophonechile.org
Rosvita Rauch
45:41
@ Jessie Reeder the website looks terrific! As a Latin American little magazine scholar, I'm excited to take a look! Will give feedback!
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
47:37
LOL. When I started the Forget Me Not “Hypertext” Archive back in 2003, I was working in frames for the layout….so funny! Troy and I started on our projects at the same time, but he obviously learned way more to create the At the Circulating Library
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
47:54
As a terrific databaase
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
49:31
DHSI in Victoria offers an entire week-long course on creating a digital edition from conception to technical aspects: https://dhsi.org/course-offerings/
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
49:41
Check out course #13 in June 2020
Jessie Reeder
50:57
Thank you, Rosvita, I hope there’s something interesting there for you!
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
50:59
Omeka and Scalar are a good place to start (freely available)
Jessie Reeder
52:02
Seconding the DHSI as an amazing resource.
Kaari N.
52:16
Yes, highly recommend Scalar as user-friendly tool for ebook/exhibition publishing
Matt
53:08
API = application program interface
Lisa M Lane
53:34
Getting some great ideas here!
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
54:40
Has anyone used the new search program created by a U.S. Library of Congress engineer/fellow - you can search the newspapers for images and across big newsprint pages
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
54:59
Thirding (?) DHSI!!! Really cool bunch of people, and there are deers and bunnies
Joshua Ortiz Baco
55:00
Newspaper Navigator ^
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
55:50
YES! Has anyone played with Newspaper Navigator?
Joshua Ortiz Baco
56:44
It’s Ben Lee’s project and it’s amazing
Joshua Ortiz Baco
57:14
I played around with the beta as well. Really interesting features and raises a lot of questions about “reading” newspapers
Jessie Reeder
57:34
Just want to reiterate, it’s really all about figuring out what you want to do first! If you want to make a map of publishing houses, you might need to learn ArcGIS. If you want to build a website, you need Scalar or Omega. If you want to make data visualizations, you might need Tableau. Etc.
Jessie Reeder
57:45
*Omeka
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
58:43
My students LOVE the latest version of free Scalar. It was way more robust for them to use as a book edition +
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
59:00
Here’s the edition: http://www.priceonepenny.info/editions/Inquisition/
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
59:05
One thing that’s really important: getting server space that’s stable (and don’t pay for it out of your own pocket)
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:00:03
+1 on Jessie Reeder
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:00:37
There are host of DH periodical projects that get at this query — the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editing is pushing this now, especially with Derrick Spires, who’s students are creating an edition of Black-owned newspapers in early 20th century in Cornell’s special collections
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:01:10
That MLA committee would like to start awarding the MLA seal to digital projects that don’t focus on a single author (gets us outside the white, male canon). Stay tuned
Ting Yan
01:04:02
Did anyone encounter copyright issues when doing digitalisation project?
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:05:15
I don’t know if Beth Gaskell is around, but I know the BL doesn’t digitize anything more recent than 150 years for that reason
Rosvita Rauch
01:05:57
@ Ting Yan -- my 2001 AHRC proposal to digitise Latin American Magazines of the 1920s was given an "A" rating, but not given funding because of copyright issues. So, yes. Others might update that information today.
Catherine Waters
01:06:57
If you want to include images from ILN for example, you need to pay for permissions @Ting Yan
Lisa M Lane
01:07:12
So then doesn’t BL hold copyright?
Rebecca Nesvet
01:08:09
indeed Marie: genre isn't an accurate descriptor for penny fiction because there are so many genres within it, many of which overlap with other kinds of publications.
James Mussell
01:08:36
when we talked to the BL about the ncse periodicals they said they were wary about anything after 1876
Rebecca Nesvet
01:08:52
and so many are "domestic romances," often while fulfilling the conventions of another genre
Lisa M Lane
01:09:10
@James yeah, everything I’m doing is 1880s and 90s
Rebecca Nesvet
01:09:25
good point about elite collectors and penny "literature for everyone."
Janine Hatter
01:09:33
When I tried to publish using an image from the BL it turned out the copyright was with another organisation that had digitized the image for the BL so there was a cost. So the BL doesn't always have the copyright for the materials
Lisa M Lane
01:10:17
@Janine but someone does, so digitisation for viewing on a website, or posting scans, could get very expensive
Andrew Hobbs
01:10:42
The BL has given a very generous licence to FindMyPast, who serve the family history market (which means they digitise lots of local papers, hurrah!)
Janine Hatter
01:10:54
We found a slightly different version of the magazine advert and the person who had copyright for that was happy to let us use it for free
Rebecca Nesvet
01:11:03
yes we do thanks!
Ting Yan
01:11:07
Thanks all for the info about copyright :)) Sort of sorry to hear about some of your stories though…
Laura Fiss
01:12:21
So I'm no copyright expert, but... I think there's a key distinction between using an *image* of a book or other archival work vs. using other types of information from that book (eg. text)
Laura Fiss
01:12:58
(oops; I see that was covered above. Serves me right for trying to multitask)
Andrew Hobbs
01:13:11
Will Slauter and Paul Fyfe are the experts on copyright; and it's not cut and dried
Lisa M Lane
01:13:13
@Laura, no, it’s a good point
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:13:22
Ooo, I disagree about recognizing DH project for a dissertation!
Janine Hatter
01:13:40
Our problem was that while the text itself was out of copyright (it was from the 1860s), the image scanned of the magazine that we wanted to use was in copyright. So it is a bit of a minefield, but worth digging around. We weren't expecting to find a free copy but did!
Rosvita Rauch
01:13:45
Thanks @ Andrew Hobbs for those names.
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:13:47
We’re working on making this more acceptable…but it’s heavily reliant on having other DHers on the professional advancement committees in the institution
Lisa M Lane
01:14:08
@Janine that’s super helpful — I have the same problem
Julie Sorge Way
01:14:23
So if you do your own images of a text pre-1876 you should be OK to use them in a digital project?
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:14:31
I did a digital archive for one chapter of my diss back in 2005, but I was working w/an explicitly textual scholar on my diss committee. Then I had to fight to get tenure with my DH stuff
Jaleen Grove
01:14:34
Disambiguation: on old stuff, in UK institutions charge for photos/scans of their holdings. They do not hold copyright over the IP being scanned - much is in PD. So you could get a copy from someone else and BL does not have rights over it. ‘Copyright’ isn’t quite the correct term here.
Jaleen Grove
01:15:17
So yes Julie, if you have your own copies and digitized them, should be ok
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:15:30
For Dig projects to “count,” it’s a matter of describing how coding/exhibits/building DH is similar to a monograph
Jaleen Grove
01:15:33
——>Not an expert, just experienced
Priti Joshi
01:15:43
Jaleen Grove's comments - YES
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:15:58
But, dig projects are not monographs, so it’s not a one-to-one comparison.
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:16:01
As you can see, Rebecca Nesvet reads them! So if you’re interested about the contents of penny bloods, she’s your gal, =P
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:17:07
Btw, everyone talking about copyright: that’s why becoming buddies with collectors (or collecting yourself) can come in handy!
James Mussell
01:17:43
Troy’s point about funding for existing projects is really important. it’s so hard to secure a second grant without coming up with something drastically new
Jessie Reeder
01:17:59
^^ definitely, Troy and James
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:18:11
The MLA has come up with some guidelines to help for professional advancement: https://www.mla.org/About-Us/Governance/Committees/Committee-Listings/Professional-Issues/Committee-on-Information-Technology/Guidelines-for-Evaluating-Work-in-Digital-Humanities-and-Digital-Media
Julie Sorge Way
01:18:12
The cost of ongoing care seems really important to consider — is this another benefit to Marie’s point about knowing more of the nuts and bolts yourself?
Jessie Reeder
01:18:33
Yes, you absolutely have to think about long-term sustainability at the OUTSET
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:19:10
..and then there’s the latest DH stuff that often takes over big grants (like NEH) - e.g., computational etc.
Jessie Reeder
01:19:27
It really helps to have server support from an institution you (or a teammate) will remain connected to.
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:20:02
Julie Sorge Way: it certainly helps that I built the website on my own: when I left Cambridge, all I had to do find my own web hosting (was dating a web developer at the time, so it’s up on his server, still is 5 years after we broke up)
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:20:13
If you’re interested in starting a DH project, Miriam Posner’s UCLA course is terrific to go through: http://miriamposner.com/classes/dh201w19/
Kate Holterhoff
01:20:13
It’s worth noting that precariously employed and itinerant academics are at a real disadvantage for securing funding for DH projects.
Jessie Reeder
01:20:27
Kate, yes, and for sustaining them.
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:20:31
So I’m not paying for hosting, just domain name, but I would be prepared to pay for web hosting out of pocket
Julie Sorge Way
01:20:35
Thanks for your responses. I’m a PhD student hoping to do a digital project as a dissertation chapter, and thus of course concerned about ongoing institutional affiliation/support
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:20:52
Julie - make sure that your project is portable (save the files)
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:21:03
I’ve moved around projects when I changed institutions
James Mussell
01:21:10
one of the things about the rsvp Field Enhancement Grant is that it’s open to anyone regardless of institutional affiliation
James Mussell
01:21:28
*ahem, Field Development
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:21:40
Keats-Shelley also has some major grants open to all. So are grants from the Bibliographical Society of America
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:21:43
exactly James! here’s what it meant to me to get the grant: https://twitter.com/Marie_LSJ/status/1283120135667097603
Linda Hughes
01:21:47
I am sorry to leave but must now. THANK YOU to all the presenters - it has been a fascinating and very worthwhile event.
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:22:05
Jesse Erickson, yes! Thank you for promoting the small, sustainable and manageable digital project!
Jennifer Phegley
01:22:44
Info. about the RSVP Field Development Grant: http://rs4vp.org/awards/rsvp-field-development-grant/
Jessie Reeder
01:23:05
I don’t have good advice on this question anyway, since I’ve gotten into DH work *after* writing my monograph for tenure. :)
Catherine Waters
01:23:21
Marie that is astonishing. You were at the wrong university.
Troy Bassett (he/him)
01:24:28
My general advice: the digital project should be a means to an end, not necessarily an end in itself. In my own case, I used the DH project to produce articles, book
Lisa M Lane
01:25:11
Thanks, Troy, that’s helpful
Fionnuala Dillane
01:25:26
agree Cathy!
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:25:33
My monograph came from my DH project…but I wrote the book *after* I got tenure and pushed my way through tenure/promotion with mostly DH stuff
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:25:40
Catherine, I know… book history, digital humanities, and popular literature were all non-starters at Cambridge at the time (apparently it’s changing)
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:26:09
How are y’all using this research in your teaching? Getting students involved? (evangeliz
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:26:24
Evangelizing always creates more periodical fans, right? ;)
James Mussell
01:26:36
matt, Jennifer can I ask the sustainability question? how are people anticipating their projects’ ends?
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:26:37
Maybe Rebecca could answer that one? =P
Laura Vorachek
01:27:09
It would be really helpful to have some kind of list: if you want to do X (data visualization, web site, etc.), here are the options
Jessie Reeder
01:27:38
There are also lots of places to publish, especially online, which while not peer-reviewed in the traditional sense, will get you a big audience and have their own prestige. (Avidly, LARB, Public Books, The Rambling, etc.) You still probably need “journal articles” for jobs/tenure/etc, but these kinds of publications do get some institutional recognition.
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:27:42
Laura, I think the easiest is to find a human being to answer those questions
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:27:54
I’d love to be that human, ( =
Jessie Reeder
01:28:00
Which is to say, these kinds of venues can be good for publishing digital stuff.
Laura Vorachek
01:28:00
Thanks!
Kaari N.
01:28:00
@Laura Voracheck Alan Liu's website DH Toychest is SUPER helpful in that regard: http://dhresourcesforprojectbuilding.pbworks.com/w/page/69244243/FrontPage
Janine Hatter
01:28:14
Q: I'm interested in de-anonymising some 19th century periodicals. Burrows Method still seems to be the main programme to use for this, but it seems quite old now. Is this still the best method? What pitfalls are there?
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:28:55
Yes, the re-made journal, Scholarly Editing, is committing to hosting small digital projects. And Reviews in Digital Humanities is offering peer reviews of DH projects (helps with normalizing peer review of DH projects)
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:29:37
Oo, Voyant Tools is a great visualization and easy to use tool http://miriamposner.com/classes/dh201w19/
James Mussell
01:29:52
journal of victorian culture reviews DH projects via its digital forum
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:30:13
Voyant: https://voyant-tools.org/
Francesca Benatti
01:30:35
@Janine The Stylo package for R is one of the main tools for authorship attribution at the moment https://computationalstylistics.github.io/
Janine Hatter
01:31:01
Thank you @francesca!
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:31:44
TaPoR is a curated list of current tools along with reviews: http://tapor.ca/home
Jennifer Phegley
01:32:35
Thank you for the links, Katherine! Very helpful.
Laurel Brake
01:32:41
re teaching, what about a paper-digital combination to have students see different forms of media materialism??
Till Grallert
01:34:43
Re: stylometry there is an important catch for reliable authorship attribution. texts should have a minimum of 5000 words
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:34:53
#SharpFriday is a weekly meet-up of book historians on Zoom on Fridays 11am-12pm Eastern/4pm-5pm UK/5pm-6pm Europe: contact me for the meeting details
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:35:12
Check out Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities - see the keywords — each has 10 pedagogical artifacts to help teach things like an archive https://digitalpedagogy.hcommons.org/keyword
Catherine Waters
01:35:23
Very helpful to have the different dimensions of sustainability outlined by Jessie - thanks. Also add - what happens when the author/curator retires (if its on a university server? (asking for a friend)
Laura Fiss
01:35:24
@Marie, does one have to be a member of SHARP?
Janine Hatter
01:35:27
@till - yes, that's an issue I'm coming across as I'd like to look at short stories
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:35:30
Also, remember, it’s ok if student projects don’t survive forever. Their ephemerality is ok
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:36:09
Dead = “Legacy project”
Patrick Leary
01:36:11
Re: sustainability, I think it's worth having a conversation about a group like RSVP "adopting" projects. The Curran Index is in a class by itself in that respect, but in theory there's no obvious reason why RSVP couldn't develop a funding model for long-term support or at least archiving of projects.
Till Grallert
01:36:19
@Janine - same here. plus stylometry being a comparative method, I oftentimes do not even have potential candidates for authorship
Jessie Reeder
01:36:28
Patrick Leary — that would be fantastic
Catherine Waters
01:36:30
Great idea Patrick!
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:36:35
Patrick: couldn’t RSVP just host those projects so they are sustained?
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:36:36
@Laura: not at all!
michelle
01:37:19
Go Jesse! (fellow librarian cringing in the wings)
Jessie Reeder
01:37:20
If you are new to DH, tho, these sustainability issues are a good reason to get your feet wet with a small project!
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:37:21
Patrick, that would sound pretty good
Troy Bassett (he/him)
01:37:44
Laurel: I do have students compare print versions of periodicals with their digital surrrogates in class
Patrick Leary
01:37:45
Hard to say -- the hosting of RSVP's own website is in transition at the moment from what I hear.
Kaari N.
01:37:45
I like Patrick's idea, but he also subtly reminds me of what Jessie was saying -- it's about sustainability; archiving these things with RSVP means that we as an organization would need to develop the sustainability plans for these projects
Matt
01:37:53
As another librarian, I want to assure Michelle this is a librarian safe space :)
Laura Ntoumanis
01:38:02
Patrick that is an intriguing idea!
Till Grallert
01:38:03
re sustainability. Check out the minimal computing approach https://go-dh.github.io/mincomp/about/
Kaari N.
01:38:03
Not saying it's not possible, but definitely the same sort of hurdle, just transferred to the community
Janine Hatter
01:38:48
@Till - yes, some authors just don't have enough texts for comparison. We have 70+ authors in, but some we'd like to add don't have enough texts available. I can't see a way around this
Rebecca Nesvet
01:39:04
to follow up on Jesse's point, migratability is why we need to learn XML, not just hTML it use of exhibit environments such as omeka
Patrick Leary
01:39:14
I would love to see RSVP become a safe harbor for important but orphaned resources.
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:39:16
Exactly Rebecca!
Till Grallert
01:39:39
@Janine - the good thing you can nevertheless do is establishing unlikely authorship candidates
Janine Hatter
01:40:59
@Till - yes, we've found new collaborations already that I would never have considered!
Kaari N.
01:41:03
YES! Thanks for bringing this up, Marie. Data vs. UI (user interface) is SO crucial when we think about sustainability
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:41:05
Running off to talk about more DH for an article. Thank you for the respite from everything in her fiery Northern California :)
Katherine D. Harris (she/her)
01:41:13
here
Rebecca Nesvet
01:41:54
good point from Marie: solid data matters so that all you change is the interface. I am excited about the potential for the COVE to do this. for my edition of the penny dreadful a mystery in Scarlet I transcribed it in XML, converted it with oxgarage, and published it at the cOVE. it's reprint able elsewhere and in other forms because it exists in XML.
Rebecca Nesvet
01:42:06
www.covecollective.org
Rosvita Rauch
01:42:37
The distinction between the dataset and the presentation of the dataset could also be the key to the copyright issue. As a scholar, you can create a dataset. The copyright issue arises when the dataset is "published".
Jennifer Phegley
01:42:46
Patrick and Kaari, the idea of RSVP as a host for projects is something we need to explore further. Bob Nicholson had a similar idea as well.
Kaari N.
01:43:16
Sorry, I'm on a different computer without microphone
Kaari N.
01:43:18
!!
Rebecca Nesvet
01:43:23
could rvsp work with an existing platform such as the Cove?
Till Grallert
01:43:53
@Janine - Wow! That is so cool.
Julie Sorge Way
01:44:40
A recent grad class I was in published a collaborative digital edition with Cove and it was a great learning experience.
Sharin Schroeder
01:45:12
On the copyright, I’ll just add that it was fine for me to make my own scans of The Morning Post at the Bodleian and post them online. I can also purchase them from The British Library, but it’s £30 per scan/discount rate of £15 because of the nature of the project. (I’m not posting BL scans.) But the Morning Post is digitized through 1909 now—that all happened fairly recently.
Bob Nicholson
01:46:14
Sorry, didn’t have my mic plugged in a minute ago! I agree that RSVP would be the ideal organisation to preserve some of these projects, though I know this poses all sorts of challenges.
Jennifer Phegley
01:47:00
Thanks, Bob! I’d love for RSVP to explore these idea further in the future!
Fionnuala Dillane
01:47:02
worth exploring those challenges for sure though?
Kaari N.
01:47:11
Agreed!
Jasmine
01:47:25
thank you for your generosity Marie!
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:47:55
if it doesn’t show, I’m a people person, so it’s actually selfish, =P
Priti Joshi
01:48:22
I have to leave. Thanks to Matt and the panelists. Really wonderful conversation!
Bob Nicholson
01:49:42
Yes, very much worth exploring! I think it’ll be a complex mix of technical challenges & navigating the restrictions placed on how the society is permitted to spend its funds. Well worth pursuing though, particularly now we’re supporting the creation of projects via field dev grants.
Laura Fiss
01:49:51
Technological tools aren't unlike theoretical tools in that sense?
Jennifer Phegley
01:50:11
Great point, Laura!
Jasmine
01:52:18
thank you very much Troy!
Jennifer Phegley
01:52:40
Join us at the RSVP Social Hour tomorrow at the same time!
Marie Léger-St-Jean (sher/her)
01:52:42
I need to plug Katie and I’s article that talks in part about how the database frees us from the first edition bias: Léger-St-Jean, Marie, et Katie McGettigan. « Exploring Transatlantic Print Culture through Digital Databases ». Édité par Alexander Dunst et Dennis Mischke. Amerikastudien/American Studies 63, nᵒ 2, "Digital Scholarship in American Studies" (2018): 159‑81.
Jennifer Phegley
01:53:13
Also, check out the RSVP Twitter event prior to the social hour at #TasteofRSVP!
Jessie Reeder
01:53:50
Thanks to RSVP, Matt, and everyone!
michelle
01:53:57
Thank you
Bob Nicholson
01:53:58
Thanks all!
Natalie Houston
01:53:59
If you are an RSVP member, please vote in our current election go to https://vote.press.jhu.edu/rsvp/ and log in with the username and password that you use on the JHUP journals website
Arnold Anthony Schmidt
01:54:01
great info!
Catherine Waters
01:54:02
Really interesting session - thank you to all speakers! Unfortunately I ca’t join the sessions tomorrow but am really grateful to the salon organisers.
Natalie McGartland
01:54:03
Thank you for a fantastic panel!
Kondrlik, Kristin E.
01:54:06
Thank you, panelists!
Jaleen Grove
01:54:06
Thank you!
Francesca Benatti
01:54:07
thanks everyone!
Laura Fiss
01:54:09
Thanks everyone!
Olivia DeClark
01:54:12
Thank you all!
Britta Bletscher
01:54:12
Thank you so much!
Mercedes Sheldon
01:54:14
Thank you!!
Laura Díaz Esteve
01:54:15
Thank you all so much!
JoKnowlesLJMU
01:54:15
Thanks everyone!
Isabel
01:54:17
Thank you so much for an absolutely fascinating panel!
Abigail Droge
01:54:17
Thank you!
Julie Sorge Way
01:54:21
Much appreciated all — @sorgeway on Twitter
Laura Vorachek
01:54:22
Thanks everyone!
Rhiannon Scharnhorst
01:54:23
Thank you!
Ting Yan
01:54:23
Thank you so much for the fantastic time!
Helen Kingstone
01:54:25
Thank you all!
Sharin Schroeder
01:54:31
Thanks! This was great!
Tara
01:54:35
Thanks everyone!
Andrew Hobbs
01:54:38
Thanks everyone, very practical and inspiring. Great chairing, Matt!
Jenna Herdman
01:54:39
Thanks so much everyone!
Jessica Terekhov
01:54:40
Hooray, grads!
ashley mistretta
01:54:42
Thank you for organizing this!
Till Grallert
01:54:43
Thank you all!
Laurel Brake
01:54:44
from Laurel: Thanks for this stimulating event...
Kaari N.
01:54:47
Thanks all!
Laura Ntoumanis
01:54:47
Thank you everyone!
Natalie Houston
01:54:49
thanks everyone!
Rosvita Rauch
01:54:51
Thank you!
Colleen McDonell (she/her)
01:55:00
Thank you to the organizers for this wonderful event!
Rebecca Nesvet
01:55:03
thank you!
Janine Hatter
01:55:04
Thank you so much for sharing your experiences with us!
Viviane Gomes da Rocha
01:55:04
Thanks